Landays: Pashtun women’s poetry of Afghanistan.

Eliza Griswold has a fascinating story about the landays:

One day in the spring of 2010, Muska phoned her fellow poets from a hospital bed in the southeastern city of Kandahar to say that she’d set herself on fire. She’d burned herself in protest. Her brothers had beaten her badly after discovering her writing poems. Poetry — especially love poetry — is forbidden to many of Afghanistan’s women: it implies dishonor and free will. Both are unsavory for women in traditional Afghan culture. Soon after, Muska died.

An example of a landay:

When sisters sit together, they always praise their brothers.

When brothers sit together, they sell their sisters to others.

About Barbara Dillon Hillas

Mother of global nomads; wife of diplomat; peripatetic lawyer; annotator of foreign service life, rule of law, culture, travel, & whatever strikes my fancy.
This entry was posted in Afghanistan, Gender, Poetry and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Landays: Pashtun women’s poetry of Afghanistan.

  1. M j Cade says:

    I have recently discoverd Landy,s and i am overjoyed by their beauty,their meaningfull simplicity and honesty.

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